History

Question

How did Africa Americans fight to gain voteing rights

2 Answer

  • The 15th Amendment

    When the new year began in 1869, the Republicans were ready to introduce a constitutional amendment guaranteeing the black man’s right to vote. For two months, Congress considered the proposed amendment. Several versions of the amendment were submitted, debated, rejected and then reconsidered in both the House and Senate.

    Finally, at the end of February 1869, Congress approved a compromise amendment that did not even specifically mention the black man:

    Section 1: The right of citizens of the United States vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.

    Section 2: The Congress shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

    Once approved by the required two-thirds majorities in the House and Senate, the 15th Amendment had to be ratified by 28, or three-fourths, of the states. Due to the reconstruction laws, black male suffrage already existed in 11 Southern states. Since almost all of these states were controlled by Republican reconstruction governments, they could be counted on to ratify the 15th Amendment. Supporters of the 15th Amendment needed only 17 of the remaining 26 Northern and Western states in order to succeed. At this time, just nine of these states allowed the black man to vote. The struggle for and against ratification hung on what blacks and other political interests would do.

  • they used nonviolent methods such as marches ex: the march on washington ,sit ins which is where they would sit down at a white only restaurant would refuse to move. ex: The Greensboro sit in. the freedom rides which were to protest interstate laws about segregation. they also used boycotts such Montgomery bus boycott
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